collecting images, stories and artifacts to bring to the media-rich classroom

 

The best book I’ve read lately on the intersection of blogs, social networks and mainstream “news”. This book is on a list of choices I have for rising AP English juniors. It may become the required reading for my Media Studies class next year. 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟👊 (that’s five stars and a fist bump) = read it!

The best book I’ve read lately on the intersection of blogs, social networks and mainstream “news”. This book is on a list of choices I have for rising AP English juniors. It may become the required reading for my Media Studies class next year. 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟👊 (that’s five stars and a fist bump) = read it!

Story: A Definition

explore-blog:

You/I – a weird and wonderful animated meditation on users and interfaces

benlowy:

33rd Street Walkscape | July 22, 2014

We live in a time of radical documentation: Cameras are within easy reach and CCTVs record our every move. Our landscape and street corners are painstakingly documented. Time and space are mere elements to be observed, recorded and stored away.

My response has been to deconstruct and compress all these elements into a kaleidoscope of overlapping imagery. Walkscapes presents both sides of our visual tendencies: the obsessive documentation of the quotidian and our growing need to retain a modicum of anonymity.

The images are made from 30-100 merged pictures taken as I walk down a city block. All are made “in-phone” at the moment of capture. 

#walkscape #art #conceptual #newyorkcity

benlowy:

33rd Street Walkscape | July 22, 2014

We live in a time of radical documentation: Cameras are within easy reach and CCTVs record our every move. Our landscape and street corners are painstakingly documented. Time and space are mere elements to be observed, recorded and stored away.

My response has been to deconstruct and compress all these elements into a kaleidoscope of overlapping imagery. Walkscapes presents both sides of our visual tendencies: the obsessive documentation of the quotidian and our growing need to retain a modicum of anonymity.

The images are made from 30-100 merged pictures taken as I walk down a city block. All are made “in-phone” at the moment of capture.

#walkscape #art #conceptual #newyorkcity

newyorker:

In the new game Query, players try to identify which questions come from a search engine’s autocomplete function, and which are typed in by users: http://nyr.kr/1A6wQRM

newyorker:

In the new game Query, players try to identify which questions come from a search engine’s autocomplete function, and which are typed in by users: http://nyr.kr/1A6wQRM

The Russian Public Has a Totally Different Understanding of What Happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 17

futurejournalismproject:

Via The New Republic:

Did you know Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was full of corpses when it took off from Amsterdam? Did you know that, for some darkly inexplicable reason, on July 17, MH17 moved off the standard flight path that it had taken every time before, and moved north, toward rebel-held areas outside Donetsk? Or that the dispatchers summoned the plane lower just before the crash? Or that the plane had been recently reinsured? Or that the Ukrainian army has air defense systems in the area? Or that it was the result of the Ukrainian military mistaking MH17 for Putin’s presidential plane, which looks strangely similar?

Did you know that the crash of MH17 was all part of an American conspiracy to provoke a big war with Russia?

Well, it’s all true — at least if you live in Russia, because this is the Malaysia Airlines crash story that you’d be seeing

…And, mind you, this is not part of a larger debate of could they, or couldn’t they; this is all of Russian television and state-friendly papers pushing one line: The pro-Russian separatists we’ve been supporting all these months couldn’t have done this. Watching some of these Russian newscasts, one comes away with the impression of a desperate defense attorney scrounging for experts and angles, or a bad kid caught red-handed by the principal, trying to twist his way out of a situation in which he has no chance.

About those corpses: The conspiracy goes that what really blew up was the Malaysian flight that disappeared into the Indian Ocean back in March. In this telling, the US had the plane (and the bodies!) and flew it over Ukraine to “dispose” of the evidence. 

Read through for Julia Ioffe’s take on Russian media and what it means for the country’s domestic politics and international relations.

Really cool looking people advertise granola… Aka I fall for another viral video as.

The idea is that children, with their sparking synapses and sponge-like brains, will be able to easily digest all the stuff that I had such trouble comprehending in my early 20s.

newsweek:

Invoke the word autocorrect and most people will think immediately of its hiccups—the sort of hysterical, impossible errors one finds collected on sites like Damn You Autocorrect. But despite the inadvertent hilarity, the real marvel of our mobile text-correction systems is how astoundingly good they are. It’s not too much of an exaggeration to call autocorrect the overlooked underwriter of our era of mobile prolixity. 

Without it, we wouldn’t be able to compose windy love letters from stadium bleachers, write novels on subway commutes, or dash off breakup texts while in line at the post office. Without it, we probably couldn’t even have phones that look anything like the ingots we tickle—the whole notion of touchscreen typing, where our podgy physical fingers are expected to land with precision on tiny virtual keys, is viable only when we have some serious software to tidy up after us. Because we know autocorrect is there as brace and cushion, we’re free to write with increased abandon, at times and in places where writing would otherwise be impossible. Thanks to autocorrect, the gap between whim and word is narrower than it’s ever been, and our world is awash in easily rendered thought. 

The Fasinatng … Frustrating … Fascinating History of Autocorrect | Gadget Lab | WIRED

newsweek:

Invoke the word autocorrect and most people will think immediately of its hiccups—the sort of hysterical, impossible errors one finds collected on sites like Damn You Autocorrect. But despite the inadvertent hilarity, the real marvel of our mobile text-correction systems is how astoundingly good they are. It’s not too much of an exaggeration to call autocorrect the overlooked underwriter of our era of mobile prolixity.

Without it, we wouldn’t be able to compose windy love letters from stadium bleachers, write novels on subway commutes, or dash off breakup texts while in line at the post office. Without it, we probably couldn’t even have phones that look anything like the ingots we tickle—the whole notion of touchscreen typing, where our podgy physical fingers are expected to land with precision on tiny virtual keys, is viable only when we have some serious software to tidy up after us. Because we know autocorrect is there as brace and cushion, we’re free to write with increased abandon, at times and in places where writing would otherwise be impossible. Thanks to autocorrect, the gap between whim and word is narrower than it’s ever been, and our world is awash in easily rendered thought.

The Fasinatng … Frustrating … Fascinating History of Autocorrect | Gadget Lab | WIRED

Latinos in Mainstream Media Are a Disappearing Act: The Latino Media Gap Crisis

The mass media entertainment business is located mainly in Los Angeles, a city that comprises over 48 percent Latinos. Furthermore, 17 percent of the United States’ population, or 53 million people, are Latino. However, mainstream media, including movie and television programming, fails to reflect such national diversity.

The result, according to filmmaker/scholar Frances Negrón-Muntaner, is a “growing and profound disconnect between the characters you see on screens and TV, and who is sitting next to you on the bus, teaching your children how to read or coming to your rescue in case of a fire.”

futurejournalismproject:

Summer Reading from The New Yorker

The New Yorker is opening up its Web site for the next few months, letting visitors read everything currently being published — along with archives back to 2007 — for free.

The move comes alongside a site redesign.

Via The New Yorker:

Beginning this week, absolutely everything new that we publish—the work in the print magazine and the work published online only—will be unlocked. All of it, for everyone. Call it a summer-long free-for-all. Non-subscribers will get a chance to explore The New Yorker fully and freely, just as subscribers always have. Then, in the fall, we move to a second phase, implementing an easier-to-use, logical, metered paywall.

Images: Twitter posts from The New Yorker… and an ellipsis for good measure.

futurejournalismproject:

Yes There is a Chrome Extension That Makes Reading the News More Fun 
The extension’s here. The code is here.
The original xkcd comic is here.

futurejournalismproject:

Yes There is a Chrome Extension That Makes Reading the News More Fun 

The extension’s here. The code is here.

The original xkcd comic is here.

Why I Left My Agent & New York Publisher by Claire Cook

booksandpublishing:

Echos why I plan to self-publish my first book.

For the sake of economy, we have to leave a lot of information out of everything we say, and one of our special human abilities is to make that economy itself eloquent and informative. Kidspeak is a classic instance of compression in balance with concision. What sounds limited and repetitive to the outsider is, to the knowing listener, as nuanced as a Henry James passage.

Adam Gopnik on the conscientiousness of Kidspeak: http://nyr.kr/1naMwO5 (via newyorker)