1. 14 Lists to Help You Find Your Next Read →

    dailyzenlist:

    1. TIME Magazine’s 100 Best All-Time Books

    2. Reddit’s Favorite Books

    3. 80 Books Every Man Should Read

    4. 3 Essential Books From Every Major Genre

    5. 67 Books Every Geek Should Read to Their Kids

    6. 32 Books George RR Martin Thinks You Should Read

    7. Bill…

  2. buzzfeedbooks:

    14 Honest Banned Book Titles

  3. How can the digital age use the tried-and-true concept of a picture book to create something new and wonderful for children?

    How about art that is as large as a child? How about details that can be examined up close while interacting with a (FREE) app on an iPad?

    This is the concept behind the KIWI (Kids Interactive Walk-In) Storybooks: 5 ft. x 7 ft. paneled screens magnificently illustrated by award-winning children’s author/illustrator Roxie Munro for kids from kindergarten through 5th grade. The lightweight, yet sturdy frames of the screens can be easily assembled and dismantled, and there are panels for eleven themes: Farm and Maze, Fire Station, Space Station and Castle, to name a few. The Velcro panels are easy to change and insert. The free apps for each KIWI StoryBook, which can be downloaded onto iPads, can initiate a scavenger hunt — searching for plants and animals in the desert or rainforest — or help a child discover sounds familiar to the Old West, or make a digital jigsaw puzzle of a photo of the art, or let a child record and edit an original movie. And that’s just the hi-tech part.

  4. ebookporn:

Libraries of the Future

    ebookporn:

    Libraries of the Future

  5. How TV influences ideas about adulthood

    What it means to be an adult has arguably changed over the years, as has TV depictions for what adulthood looks like.

  6. Sports Stories and Critical Media Literacy →

    Article by Mark A. Fabrizi and Robert D. Ford from the September 2014 issue of the English Journal.

  7. mediamattersforamerica:

Do they really want to get into the Reagan administration’s handling of conflicts in the Middle East? 
For examples, see: Beirut, Iran-Contra

Historical fan fiction- yes! From Fox News as a part of a hypothetical news story- no!

    mediamattersforamerica:

    Do they really want to get into the Reagan administration’s handling of conflicts in the Middle East?

    For examples, see: Beirut, Iran-Contra

    Historical fan fiction- yes!
    From Fox News as a part of a hypothetical news story- no!

  8. npr:

For the past several weeks, the video game industry has been embroiled in a heated, sometimes ugly, debate, under the hashtag #Gamergate.

It’s a debate about a lot of things and it involves a lot of people, but at its heart, #Gamergate is about two key things: ethics in video game journalism, and the role and treatment of women in the video game industry — an industry that has long been dominated by men.
#Gamergate Controversy Fuels Debate On Women And Video Games
Photo: iStockphoto

    npr:

    For the past several weeks, the video game industry has been embroiled in a heated, sometimes ugly, debate, under the hashtag #Gamergate.

    It’s a debate about a lot of things and it involves a lot of people, but at its heart, #Gamergate is about two key things: ethics in video game journalism, and the role and treatment of women in the video game industry — an industry that has long been dominated by men.

    #Gamergate Controversy Fuels Debate On Women And Video Games

    Photo: iStockphoto

  9. new-aesthetic:

Dad gets OfficeMax mail addressed ‘Daughter Killed in Car Crash’ - Los Angeles Times

An off-and-on customer of OfficeMax, Mike Seay has gotten the office supply company’s junk mail for years. But the mail that the grieving Lindenhurst, Ill., father said he got from OfficeMax last week was different. It was addressed to “Mike Seay, Daughter Killed in Car Crash.” Strange as that sounds, the mail reached the right guy. Seay’s daughter Ashley, 17, was killed in a car crash with her boyfriend last year. OfficeMax somehow knew. And in a world where bits of personal data are mined from customers and silently sold off and shuffled among corporations, Seay appears to be the victim of some marketing gone horribly wrong.

    new-aesthetic:

    Dad gets OfficeMax mail addressed ‘Daughter Killed in Car Crash’ - Los Angeles Times

    An off-and-on customer of OfficeMax, Mike Seay has gotten the office supply company’s junk mail for years. But the mail that the grieving Lindenhurst, Ill., father said he got from OfficeMax last week was different. It was addressed to “Mike Seay, Daughter Killed in Car Crash.” Strange as that sounds, the mail reached the right guy. Seay’s daughter Ashley, 17, was killed in a car crash with her boyfriend last year. OfficeMax somehow knew. And in a world where bits of personal data are mined from customers and silently sold off and shuffled among corporations, Seay appears to be the victim of some marketing gone horribly wrong.

  10. mediamattersforamerica:

    Science and journalism figures ask why Sunday news shows decided to ignore the historical People’s Climate March, which pulled in an estimated 400,000 attendees. 

    This will go well with our next unit on silence…

  11. Amazon Allows Family Sharing for Purchases →

    ebookporn:

  12. New Tech City marquee The ‘Bi-literate’ Brain: The Key to Reading in a Sea of Screens

    Link to New Tech City

    Quotes from this episode:

    On why a ‘bi-literate’ brain is important: “There are things in our lives, whether they be novels, short stories, mortgage documents, whatever, that actually need our slow reading,” Mike Rosenwald, Washington Post staff writer. “In the old days before the internet, reading was a linear event,” Mike Rosenwald.

    On ideal reader: “What we’re after is a discerning ‘bi-literate’ brain: A child who knows when to allocate attention to those deep reading processes and when to play and move from one interesting thing after another,” Dr. Maryanne Wolf.

    The internet is not making us dumber but it is changing us: “I don’t worry that we will become dumb because of the internet, but I worry that we will not use our most preciously acquired deep reading processes because we are given too much stimulation,” Dr. Maryanne Wolf.

    On the eventual convergence of screens and paper reading: “It’s a very young medium. My hopes are that its imperfections will be addressed such that the medium is not of any difference,” Maria Popova. “I actually prefer electronic reading in some regards,” Maria Popova.

  13. explore-blog:

East vs. West, in minimalist infographics of cultural differences

    explore-blog:

    East vs. West, in minimalist infographics of cultural differences

  14. High school newspaper editor suspended for refusing to print the word “redskin” →

    hipsterenglishteacher:

    Editor-in-chief Gillian McGoldrick and faculty advisor Tara Huber were suspended from the Neshaminy High School’s newspaper, in an ongoing battle with administrators about the use of the word “redskin.”

    The editors of the Pennsylvania high school’s Playwickian paper refuse to print the offensive term “redskin,” the name of the school mascot, going against the orders of principal Ron McGee.

    McGoldrick received a one-month suspension from her duties at the paper, while Huber received a two-day suspension from work without pay from the superintendent of Neshaminy School District, according toStudent Press Law Center. Earlier this year, Huber received the Pennsylvania School Press Association’s Journalism Teacher of the Year.

    The controversy, which ended with Huber and McGoldrick’s suspension, and $1,200 being removed from the student paper’s account, began last year when the editors  decided to remove the word “redskin” from the paper. However, in June, a student submitted a letter to the editor that contained the word three times.

    “The staff replaced all but the first letter with dashes, following The Associated Press style for slurs,” the Student Press Law Center wrote. ”In his prior review of the issue, Principal Ron McGee told the students to print the word in full or not print the paper at all.”

    Huber left the room, the students decided not to print the word, and sent the paper to print, student editor Maddy Buffardi explained.

    This high school battle brings up the issues of free speech, freedom of the press and of course the controversial term “redskin” — and the team names and mascots in conjunction with it.

    Right On, Gillian and Tara!  

  15. Your paper brain and your Kindle brain aren't the same thing →

    (Source: gothamknowledge)