1. Is anyone else confused by the timing of the cover of the latest edition of ESPN magazine? All I see is: (a) silly black man, cops are friends/fans. 
Does ESPN assume the country is “over” Ferguson?  The last time the cops were in the news with a black man, neither looked so carefree…
It tells me that ESPN thinks white cops are more of their demographic than black athletes.
Tbh, I’m not ready for ESPN (or anyone) use a corporate sporting season to tell me that this is the usual relationship between these two demographics. I know better…

    Is anyone else confused by the timing of the cover of the latest edition of ESPN magazine? All I see is: (a) silly black man, cops are friends/fans.
    Does ESPN assume the country is “over” Ferguson? The last time the cops were in the news with a black man, neither looked so carefree…
    It tells me that ESPN thinks white cops are more of their demographic than black athletes. Tbh, I’m not ready for ESPN (or anyone) use a corporate sporting season to tell me that this is the usual relationship between these two demographics. I know better…

  2. Despite Heavy Internet Use, Millennials Think Libraries are Useful - SocialTimes →

    ebookporn:

  3. nprplays:

With Minecraft, Microsoft Buys A Doorway To Millions Of Players

Since its release, Minecraft has become that doorway for a great many players of all ages and demographics, especially those that might not label themselves as a “gamer.” Like Farmville or Candy Crush, it is entry-level gaming. Minecraft is casual; there are no explosions or politics or machismo-heavy protagonists. You are in control of its world and it is only as difficult as you want to make it.
What Microsoft has essentially done is buy a very popular doorway. As new players enter the world of video games through Minecraft, either in its current or possible future versions, Microsoft will now be the doorman ushering that player into its game room instead of the competition’s.
Photo Credit:  Miles Willis/Getty Images for Ascot Racecourse

    nprplays:

    With Minecraft, Microsoft Buys A Doorway To Millions Of Players

    Since its release, Minecraft has become that doorway for a great many players of all ages and demographics, especially those that might not label themselves as a “gamer.” Like Farmville or Candy Crush, it is entry-level gaming. Minecraft is casual; there are no explosions or politics or machismo-heavy protagonists. You are in control of its world and it is only as difficult as you want to make it.

    What Microsoft has essentially done is buy a very popular doorway. As new players enter the world of video games through Minecraft, either in its current or possible future versions, Microsoft will now be the doorman ushering that player into its game room instead of the competition’s.

    Photo Credit:  Miles Willis/Getty Images for Ascot Racecourse

  4. insp (x

    (Source: alrightevans)

  5. explore-blog:


The mouse, with its ability to click on specific parts of a document, was the device that made hypertext possible. Without hypertext, there would be no links, and without links, no web. 

The first computer mouse, held by its inventor, Douglas Engelbart, in 1963 – one of the 100 ideas that changed the web. 

    explore-blog:

    The mouse, with its ability to click on specific parts of a document, was the device that made hypertext possible. Without hypertext, there would be no links, and without links, no web. 

    The first computer mouse, held by its inventor, Douglas Engelbart, in 1963 – one of the 100 ideas that changed the web

  6. 11 Websites to Help You Save Your Favorite Online Content →

    dailyzenlist:

    1. Instapaper.com — Save anything and read it on any device.

    2. GetPocket.com — Save stuff from your browser or apps like Twitter, Flipboard, and Pulse, and read it later.

    3. TabShare.me — Save and share your tabs with this free Chrome extension.

    4. Evernote.com — Easily…

  7. I predict that in 2050, we’ll look back at the first 20 years of the web and shake our heads. The craptacular design! The hallucinogenic business models! The privacy nightmares! All because entrepreneurs convinced themselves that they couldn’t do what inventors have done for centuries: Charge people a fair price for things they want.

    — 

    Three years ago, Wired’s Clive Thompson, who has since explored the unsuspected ways in which the web is making us smarter, made a heartening case for the backlash against the malady that is online advertising. Today, more and more, one has hope that Thompson will end up right.

    (HT @EthanZ)

  8. futurejournalismproject:

If You Suddenly Find Yourself Covering Gender-Based Violence
Ray Rice’s assault on his wife put domestic violence front and center of the news where it’s being covered by many who have no experience reporting on the issue.
Enter WITNESS’ guide for conducting interviews with survivors of gender-based violence. It’s an important resource for those thinking of interviewing survivors about the issue, or reporting on gender-based violence more deeply.
Via the Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma:

The Guide to Interviewing Survivors of Sexual and Gender-Based Violence is an illustrated how-to resource for documenting the stories of survivors of sexual and gender-based violence safely, effectively and ethically.
Designed for human rights activists, advocates, citizen journalists and filmmakers, the guide covers prep and planning for conducting and sharing interviews, and helps navigate the terrain of social stigma and shame, threats of retribution by perpetrators and/or institutions that may wish to bury the story and the imperative to ensure the emotional and physical safety of interview subjects.

The guide can be downloaded here. A companion video series can be viewed here.
Image: Cover detail, via WITNESS.

    futurejournalismproject:

    If You Suddenly Find Yourself Covering Gender-Based Violence

    Ray Rice’s assault on his wife put domestic violence front and center of the news where it’s being covered by many who have no experience reporting on the issue.

    Enter WITNESS’ guide for conducting interviews with survivors of gender-based violence. It’s an important resource for those thinking of interviewing survivors about the issue, or reporting on gender-based violence more deeply.

    Via the Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma:

    The Guide to Interviewing Survivors of Sexual and Gender-Based Violence is an illustrated how-to resource for documenting the stories of survivors of sexual and gender-based violence safely, effectively and ethically.

    Designed for human rights activists, advocates, citizen journalists and filmmakers, the guide covers prep and planning for conducting and sharing interviews, and helps navigate the terrain of social stigma and shame, threats of retribution by perpetrators and/or institutions that may wish to bury the story and the imperative to ensure the emotional and physical safety of interview subjects.

    The guide can be downloaded here. A companion video series can be viewed here.

    Image: Cover detail, via WITNESS.

  9. pbsdigitalstudios:

    You may be finding your favorite websites “slowing down” for net neutrality today.

    What does it all mean? Is the Internet a public utility?

    Find out in this classic episode of PBS Idea Channel.

    (The views discussed in this episode do not necessarily reflect the views of PBS or its member stations. All thoughts and opinions presented are the province of Mike Rugnetta.) 

  10. explore-blog:

    When photographer John William Keedy was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder — arguably the defining psychic malady of our era, and something that paralyzed even Darwin — he began documenting his experience in a moving photo series, an unusual and remarkable manifestation of the link between creativity and mental illness

    This is a really great example of an image essay. In this case, the artist created images that convey cohesive meaning. For my students, the task may start from a text but their meaning making process or final product may look like this. I love it.

  11. viceuk:

TAKE A LOOK INSIDE THE WORLD OF ONLINE FEMINIST BASHING.

    viceuk:

    TAKE A LOOK INSIDE THE WORLD OF ONLINE FEMINIST BASHING.

  12. Welcome! Check out the archive—

    Hey there new folks! I’ve been (super) excited about so many new followers in the last few days.
    If you’re new to medialiteracyteacher, be sure to check out the archive. I usually post/reblog anything relates to media representation; reading various/untraditional genres with interesting notes to make about bias, authorship, manipulation, multiple perspectives,etc; art/images as text; educational technology (a little); social media or the news media in the classroom and any other random book/English teacher stuff I find interesting. :)
    Cheers! And welcome!

  13. “Tampon Run,” A Game From Two Teenagers Who Want You To Know That Periods Are Totally Normal | Co.Exist | World changing ideas and innovation →

  14. "The Finalists Of The 2014 Innovation By Design Awards: Apps" →

    dbreunig:

    Reporter is in ridiculously good company.

  15. History is not a long series of centuries in which men did all the interesting/important things and women stayed home and twiddled their thumbs in between pushing out babies, making soup and dying in childbirth.

    History is actually a long series of centuries of men writing down what they thought was important and interesting, and FORGETTING TO WRITE ABOUT WOMEN. It’s also a long series of centuries of women’s work and women’s writing being actively denigrated by men. Writings were destroyed, contributions were downplayed, and women were actively oppressed against, absolutely.

    But the forgetting part is vitally important. Most historians and other writers of what we now consider “primary sources” simply didn’t think about women and their contribution to society. They took it for granted, except when that contribution or its lack directly affected men.

    This does not in any way mean that the female contribution to society was in fact less interesting or important, or complicated, simply that history—the process of writing down and preserving of the facts, not the facts/events themselves—was looking the other way.”

    —  Tansy Raynar Roberts  (via feministquotes)