collecting images, stories and artifacts to bring to the media-rich classroom

 

explore-blog:

On this day in 1920, the19th Amendment was passed and American women got the right to vote, but not without pushback—appalling anti-suffragette postcards from the early 20th century remind us of women’s plight.
Pair with Roxane Gay on the blind spots of the equality movement a century later.

explore-blog:

On this day in 1920, the19th Amendment was passed and American women got the right to vote, but not without pushback—appalling anti-suffragette postcards from the early 20th century remind us of women’s plight.

Pair with Roxane Gay on the blind spots of the equality movement a century later.

10 Team-Building Games That Promote Critical Thinking

revolutionizeed:

Saving this for the first days of school…

My experience becoming a Google Educator and some tips

classroomcollective:

I has kept on hearing about people being Google certified and I was interested. But what was it all about?

If you are interested in becoming a Google Educator, visit this website Google for Education. It has all of the information to begin your journey. In order to begin your training, go to

Maybe I’ll do this next summer?

BuzzFeed Style Guide

buzzfeed:

ladyjanela:

From bats hit to F-you (as a noun) to OG (no periods) to Do not adhere to vanity capitalization. A true style guide, in ever way possible. And Yes, I am flagrant offender of Vanity Capitalzation.

BUT OUR STYLE GUIDE SAYS NOT TO USE VANITY CAPITALIZATION

The sexual exploitation of women is especially predominant in advertising, which is impossible to escape because ads are omnipresent. Thin, barely clothed bodies appear in magazines and on the backs of buses. Intimate close-up shots of smoky bedroom eyes belonging to a woman wearing only lace negligee stare down at passerby from high billboards. Pelvic shots and chiseled bodies come through the television and the computer. They are in every clothing store and adorn the pages of weekly sales circulars.

The mechanism used in these ads is quite simple: Attractive bodies are employed to grab attention and simulate desire, which advertisers hope will then be transferred to the product. Buy the beer, get the girl. In this way, women’s bodies are equated with commodities, presented as rewards of consumption. By instructing men to regard women’s bodies as objects, ads help create an atmosphere that devalues women as people, encourages sexual harassment, and worse (Jacobson and Mazur 1995:84).

Often times the women portrayed in these ads are not even whole. The pictures show only legs, torsos, or an open mouth with rouge lip color provocatively placed atop a glass bottle. This reduces women to collections of parts, something less than human. This objectification and sexploitation has changed the rules of society and along with it the attitudes of men and women have changed.

Just as simple films relying on crude jokes and violence are perfect for the global marketplace, since they require little translation, so is advertising that relies entirely on image. Bare breasts and phallic symbols are understood everywhere. As are the nude female buttocks featured in the Italian and German ads for similar worthless products to remedy the imaginary problem of cellulite. Unfortunately, such powerful imagery of[ten] pollutes the cultural environment (Kilbourne 1999:72).

futurejournalismproject:

St. Louis Dispatch
Its coverage can be read here.
Related, via Poynter — How St. Louis’ Alt-Weekly is Covering Ferguson:

The episode has exhausted the reporters, many of whom worked long hours with little sleep in between. Lindsay Toler, a news blogger, was halfway through a bottle of Busch at a cash-only dive bar on Sunday when she saw TV reports of the chaos in Ferguson. She left without saying a word to her friends and spent the rest of the night monitoring the story on Twitter. She estimates she has worked several 12-hour days since then, with about five hours of sleep daily. Lussenhop said she and her fellow journalists are running on about three to five hours of sleep most days. Garrison tried to convince his reporters to take a break, but they resisted. On Thursday, he edited a story from an wiped-out reporter who spelled “Ferguson” four different ways…
…Because of the scope of the story, the paper has devoted most of its small editorial staff to covering Ferguson. Of the 39 stories published on the paper’s news blog last week, 34 of them were about the suburb. The other five were written before the shooting. 

Image: Detail, front page, St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

futurejournalismproject:

St. Louis Dispatch

Its coverage can be read here.

Related, via PoynterHow St. Louis’ Alt-Weekly is Covering Ferguson:

The episode has exhausted the reporters, many of whom worked long hours with little sleep in between. Lindsay Toler, a news blogger, was halfway through a bottle of Busch at a cash-only dive bar on Sunday when she saw TV reports of the chaos in Ferguson. She left without saying a word to her friends and spent the rest of the night monitoring the story on Twitter. She estimates she has worked several 12-hour days since then, with about five hours of sleep daily. Lussenhop said she and her fellow journalists are running on about three to five hours of sleep most days. Garrison tried to convince his reporters to take a break, but they resisted. On Thursday, he edited a story from an wiped-out reporter who spelled “Ferguson” four different ways…

…Because of the scope of the story, the paper has devoted most of its small editorial staff to covering Ferguson. Of the 39 stories published on the paper’s news blog last week, 34 of them were about the suburb. The other five were written before the shooting. 

Image: Detail, front page, St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

I’m starting to understand the real failings of multi-cultural education growing up in K-12 schools. We gave everyone access to the “fun” parts of culture. Let’s sing the dreidel song! Now we understand the Jewish experience. Let’s talk about segregation. Wasn’t that wrong. Aren’t we glad it’s over? Let’s take turns reading parts of the “I Have a Dream” speech. We had access to the easy stuff without having to really examine the hard stuff. And we were giving easy access to things that aren’t “ours” and shouldn’t be “ours.” So you can’t just pick up the “fun” stuff and put it into your party theme or Facebook pictures. I’m using simple terms like fun because that’s how multiculturalism was given to us as children. And while it may have served a purpose at the time, it gave us too much access to claim things that aren’t ours.

I honestly, honestly think that is some of the reasons why the race parties are such a horrible fad on college campuses. They are carrying on what we did in elementary school. Let’s make culture a party! Everyone bring your cultural food and put on a costume! The racism is present and good percentage of the participants are really expressing deep rooted racism. But some truly don’t want to “understand why it’s wrong” when they are re-enacting what we used to do with culture in elementary schools. Culture was supposed to be fun. “I don’t understand why you are mad now? I thought culture was a party!” Party’s over kids. Put down the head-dress.

Brian Henry (via theteej)

andersoncountylibrary:

kemendraugh:

This is my little brother, reading my Hawkeye issue #19. He is hearing impaired and is currently using/learning sign language as his primary means of communication. He spent his entire lunchtime pouring over this comic, so excited about his language being in one of my books! And a superhero book!

mattfractionblog, thank you for this. 

(We have the entire Signing Time series too, and our lives would be poorer without it! Such a blessing.)

This is why we need diverse books.

newsweek:

How does the end of a real-life relationship change our enduring relationship with social networks? What can be done to make real-life breakups less debilitating? How can we make them harder, if we’re into that sort of thing for artistic suffering or whatever, not that I am? 

When You Fall Out of Love, This Is What Facebook Sees - The Atlantic

newsweek:

How does the end of a real-life relationship change our enduring relationship with social networks? What can be done to make real-life breakups less debilitating? How can we make them harder, if we’re into that sort of thing for artistic suffering or whatever, not that I am?

When You Fall Out of Love, This Is What Facebook Sees - The Atlantic

good:

This Artist Turned a Bad Habit into Insane, Junk Food-Drenched Art

good:

This Artist Turned a Bad Habit into Insane, Junk Food-Drenched Art

10 Website to Deliver You the News

dailyzenlist:

1. NewsMap.jp — News categorized by topic and country.

2. News.Google.com — Google aggregates the top stories from sources across the world.

3. TrendsMap.com — A map of the things trending on Twitter across the world.

4. SmashFuse.com — Search trending terms and find out what…